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Recipe

In the lead up to International Mourvedre Day on Friday the 21st May, we spoke to much loved local chef (and self-declared francophile) Mark McNamara about the perfect dish to match with our Annexus Mataro. True to his moniker of the “Food Luddite” he has suggested a classic French dish that simply requires really good quality ingredients and a little time – much like making Mataro from beautiful old vines.

Duck Rillettes

1kg duck legs and thighs (bone-in, skin on)

50g duck fat or lard

150 ml stock

60 ml verjuice

½ bay leaf

1 Sprig fresh thyme

2 cloves garlic

½ sm onion (diced)

½ teaspoon Salt

60 ml brandy

Pinch Ground black pepper  

Pinch quatre-épices (clove, nutmeg, pepper, ginger)

Method

  • Place duck, fat, stock, verjuice, bayleaf, thyme, garlic, salt, pepper and 30ml of the brandy into a heavy casserole seal tightly with foil and lid and cook very slowly in the oven at approx 120°c 
  • When the meat falls off of the bone (approx 3 – 4 hours) Strain juices from meat and reserving juices to one side. Do not discard
  • Remove meat from bone and place in a bowl taking care to ensure all bone fragments are removed and discarded. Add remaining solids and using two forks shred the mixture by pulling duck meat into fine strands. Do not use any mechanical tools for this process or you will end up with a paste rather than the desired texture
  • Once evenly shredded, add the remaining brandy, black pepper and spice mixture then slowly add the reserved duck juices (including the fat – very important to this dish) a little at a time continuing to shred the mixture until all the juices have been incorporated. 
  • Check seasoning and add extra salt and pepper if required, the mixture should be highly seasoned and emulsified.
  • Cover, (traditionally with rendered duck fat) cool and store in the fridge until required, allow to come up to room temperature before serving with crusty bread or toast and a glass of Mataro.

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Vintage 2021 wrap up

We’ve just pressed off our last ferment for the vintage, and as the we sit back and reflect on John’s 48th Barossa vintage it is one that will be remembered fondly.  

When asked to sum up the vintage, John reflected that: 

it is a rarity to get healthy yields like we have in 2021, and at the same time, impressive depth of colour and intensity of flavour. While not as cool as 2012 or 2017, the mild conditions around harvest made for perfect ripening. Pleasingly the wines show a vibrance and elegance expressed in the best cooler years, but not without trademark Barossa generosity.